Racism, Travel and the Noble Savage in Translation by Margaret Saine

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A warning forthwith: I’m retired, and therefore have the fool’s freedom of free play, that is, I have the right to only deal with the literature I like anymore! And I want to start with a quote of the great German-American anthropologist at Columbia University, New York, Franz Boas. He said in 1905: “If we… Continue reading Racism, Travel and the Noble Savage in Translation by Margaret Saine

Impact of Indian Classical Music on La Monte Young’s Drone Music by Imran Firdaus

Abstract As per the title, the aim of the research report is to explore and examine the relation and impact of Indian classical music on drone music concept via La Monte Young’s practice and state of contemporary ambient music. La Monte Young is recognized as one of the early minimalist and experimentalist composers in post… Continue reading Impact of Indian Classical Music on La Monte Young’s Drone Music by Imran Firdaus

THE INVISIBLE VICTORY OF MUJO BUCPAPAJ’S POETRY BY OLTA TOTONI

  Poetry is an invisible victory. The poet creates a whirl of words that follow one another naturally and freely without limits. The images of the writer haunt the minds of the reader and the poetry explodes like a volcano. In the first phase, it is quiet, and then it bursts and gets everything it… Continue reading THE INVISIBLE VICTORY OF MUJO BUCPAPAJ’S POETRY BY OLTA TOTONI

Memoir: Poet who Survived Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Attack by Bhisma Upreti

Celebrated Scottish poet Tessa Ransford emailed me about Japanese poet Bun Hasijume – ‘Poet Bun Hasijume had a narrow escape from atomic bomb attack in Hirosima during Second World War. In case you are going to Japan try to make a visit to her too’. Tessa’s email instigated the interest and curiosity of the writer… Continue reading Memoir: Poet who Survived Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Attack by Bhisma Upreti

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RELATING THE MYTH OF PHILOCTETES TO LIFE IN THE LIGHT OF SEAMUS HEANEY’S “THE CURE AT TROY” BY Shahida Parveen and Madiha Saeed

The story “The Cure at Troy” is based on the myth of Philoctetes by Sophocles. Philoctetes was a great hero who got fame as an archer. As a warrior, he was on his way to Trojan War when he was bitten by a serpent. Philoctetes was exiled by the Greeks due to the wound on… Continue reading RELATING THE MYTH OF PHILOCTETES TO LIFE IN THE LIGHT OF SEAMUS HEANEY’S “THE CURE AT TROY” BY Shahida Parveen and Madiha Saeed

The Myth of Lilith Throughout Jewish Folklore By Rocco A. Astore

Abstract This article will first investigate the historical roots of the Jewish myth of Lilith. Next, by giving a chronological account of the sacred literature surrounding Lilith, I will detail how she went from an enigmatic figure in the Book of Genesis to a wicked one in Isaiah. Finally, I will suggest, Lilith, by being… Continue reading The Myth of Lilith Throughout Jewish Folklore By Rocco A. Astore

Language and Identity Perception in Nazım Hikmet’s Poetry during Exile Years by Hülya Bayrak Akyıldız

INTRODUCTION In this paper, Nazım Hikmet’s poetry in exile years, from 1951 to his death in 1963, is examined in terms of identity projection and the role of language in this.     Nazım Hikmet is one of the greatest poets of our age. His greatness lies in his ability to meet universality and the search of… Continue reading Language and Identity Perception in Nazım Hikmet’s Poetry during Exile Years by Hülya Bayrak Akyıldız

Three Palimpsestic Layers of meaning in H.D.’s “The Master” by Nikitas Paterakis

H.D.’s psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud was undoubtedly a milestone in the poet’s life and writing career. Not only did Freud manage to cleanse H.D. from ghosts of the past – H.D. writes in Advent that “we are all haunted houses” (146) – but he also played an instrumental role in reconnecting the poet to her… Continue reading Three Palimpsestic Layers of meaning in H.D.’s “The Master” by Nikitas Paterakis

An Intimate Talk by Niels Hav

Poetry is such a futile activity. I’m sure most poets know the feeling. We run around in the streets tormented by astounding metaphors. Who care if we find the right word or not?